Please book your COVID-19 vaccinations

I received the text last Friday.

It was just a short note from my doctor inviting me to book in a time to get my COVID-19 vaccination.

I hadn’t given much thought to getting vaccinated. I knew my turn was coming, but I’d thought it would come much later.

When I first heard the news that a vaccine to fight COVID-19 was created, I was overjoyed. Finally, an opportunity to fight this awful pandemic. A chance to return to the life we knew before. No more COVID deaths. No more overworked health care staff and a health system on the verge of teetering over.

This was the breakthrough the world needed. It couldn’t have come fast enough.

I laughed at all the conspiracy theories. And there were a few really good ones.

But now that I am facing the needle myself, I can’t help feeling a little nervous. What if some of those theories were not that crazy? Did I really want my DNA altered and develop the ability to read minds?

Ha! As if that was likely to happen. But still, a tiny, unsure part of me did wonder.

I texted my husband as soon as I got the message from my doctor. I was looking for some reassurance.

He told me the worst it could do was turn me into a 5G conductor and help out our internet access at home by a country mile. So I should totally go for it.

I think he was a little envious. Because the next thing he asked was “Where’s mine?”

He is rather sweet.

If I truly loved him, I would take the shot first to double check everything is fine before I pushed him into the queue. But that tiny, uncertain part of me doesn’t want to go first.

I realised it’s quite powerful — the fear of the unknown. I didn’t think I would react quite as strongly as this.

Here was a modern miracle, an example of extraordinary dedication and hard work, being offered to me for free for my benefit. It would have gone through rigorous testing before it was made available to the public. Thousands of people are being vaccinated each day and the vast majority are without ill effects. Even the Queen was vaccinated early this year and she seems quite fine.

I took a deep breath, put my big girl pants on and clicked on the link that was texted to me. I put in my date of birth as proof of my identity and booked in my time for the end of this week.

I’ll let you know if the internet connection at our home improves.

Featured image by Hakan Nural on Unsplash

18 Comments

  1. I’ve had 2 shots of the Pfizer vaccine. Also, I just read that Bill Gate’s daughter was getting her vaccine too, if that helps. The First shot, my arm was a little sore, like the normal flu shot. The Second shot, my arm was a little sore…. then about 24 hours later I had chills and a slight fever for about 2 hours… then I was back to normal, no issues. OH, they say NOT to take medication, ie Tylenol or Ibuprofen BEFORE the shot, it reduces the effectiveness. This is what I read. Wait 3 hours, then you can take medication if your arm is shore. I work for a hospital, most people had a sore arm and that is all.

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  2. Your husband is funny. I understand your being cautious–but if it’s okay for the Queen… Here’s to health and wellness and the end to this pandemic coming soon, I hope. And to faster internet speeds. Couldn’t we just have both!?

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  3. Your husband’s comments made me laugh out loud. I love his sense of humor! I can totally understand your reluctance. I feel the same way. I am in no rush to get in the queue. Maybe it is because the whole process here in New York feels like a strange version of The Hunger Games, or because my colleagues are all quite sick from the second dose.

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    1. Hehe! He does have his moments 😁 Well, I guess I’ll find out soon. People have been working very hard in the UK to get the vaccine to as many people as possible. I’ve had friends volunteer to ring people to schedule jabs as well as spend the day administering them. It’s been all systems go here. And from a distance, quite impressively organised.

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  4. Go for it! Been a little mum about it, but as a “volunteer firefighter” (rural Search and Rescue), I just got my second round of Moderna a week ago. I’ve been thinking about writing something fact-based to allay some of the fears people seem to have about the new vaccines. The mRNA vaccines can’t give you Covid… period. Just be prepared for some discomfort afterward as your body builds up the immunity that the vaccine is intended to get it to create, though nothing even approaching a serious case of the disease. Unfortunately, it hasn’t improved my Internet.

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    1. I think you should write something LT. I think it would only help. There is so much fear out there because this vaccine is so new. Something fact based and from personal experience could only serve to counter that. A pity about the internet though…

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  5. Too funny! I’m sure it will go great, and you’ll be back to your old way of life in no time…likely with the same slow-at-all-the-wrong-times internet connection. Haha! In all seriousness, most of the ill effects from the mRNA vaccine have been in those with a particular allergy. Unfortunately, I fall into that group, but the traditional vaccines are right around the corner. It’s hard not to have some concerns and nerves with something so new, but I think the data will emerge soon enough that the conspiracies were just that. Good luck!

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    1. Thank you so much! I’ll see how I go. I don’t have any allergies that I know of. I get the occasional hay fever in spring, but that’s about it. So I should be ok!👌

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