It was a cold and wet day today. The sky was grey as the rain drizzled down. We woke in near dark and helped our son get ready for school in the dim light.

I got his breakfast and lunch ready. A job that his father does most days. We are settling into a routine and you would have thought it was like any ordinary day.

But it wasn’t.

Today was the day of the “Brexit general election”. The day when many people in this country went to the polls to vote for politicians from various parties with differing stances on whether or not they should remain in the European Union.

I haven’t been following it closely. I just know that the conservatives are for it. The Liberal Democrats are against it. And Jeremy Corbyn looks scarier than Brexit.

There is no democracy sausage here. Just long queues and people patiently waiting to have their say. All very sensible.

I walked past signs to a local polling booth as I headed in the post office in Wimbledon to get my son an Oyster card. It allows him to travel cheaply around London. With only my husband working for the time being, we need to be as thrifty as possible.

He is working tonight.

“I’ll be home late,” he told me this morning over cornflakes and milk. “They’ve got me working on the election news.”

I have the tele on his station.

The exit polls have just come in. Looks like Boris Johnson has got, as one commentator put it, a “stonking” majority. It’s still early, but if these polls are correct, it seems like it will be the biggest majority for the Conservative party since Thatcher was in power.

Wow. People must have really wanted to get out of the EU.

I have been a somewhat confused observer in Australia. I didn’t think ahead and take notice. Because I am now going to be in the midst of the implication of this election result.

Far from closely following the unfolding drama in the lead up to the election, I have been preoccupied with setting up our home in London.

I have been too engrossed in finding the best couch for a fair price. It arrives next week. Our beds arrive tomorrow and we are still on the hunt for a table and some chairs. We’ll need them soon. Our son has been doing his homework on the floor.

For the first time in a long while, I haven’t been plugged into politics. Instead of reading the paper this afternoon, I got out two cups close to the time our son would walk through our door – cold and wet from his walk home from school.

I found a lot of pleasure in making hot cups of tea for both of us.