Him: My friends and I have just started reading Lord of the Rings.

Me: Really? You don’t find it too hard?

H: Nah. It has old words like thus and nay and stuff. But that’s ok.

M: what do you like about it?

H: It looks really cool in my imagination.

He had difficulties with literacy until he met the right teacher in Grade 3. Mr W noticed our boy struggling and gave him intensive support throughout the school year. By the end of Grade 3, T was reading for pleasure.

The photo was taken at an airport. We were waiting for our flight. He was reading J. K. Rowling. He was engrossed. We could have left him there and he wouldn’t have noticed.

For Debbie’s Six Word Saturday!

15 Comments

  1. Ah, yes; mine was Mr Blake, who noticed that the stuff my peers were reading was waaaaaaay below my ability to decipher and comprehend, started bringing me (considerably) more advanced texts, and setting aside some one-on-one time to discuss them with me.

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  2. My Youngest struggled too with reading tales and books. It’s was tricky to encourage him to read, so I gave him a pack of comics. He red a lot of “Lucky Luke” and he realized that reading is not impossible for him. But for books he was always cheating with a lot of words; he was reading only the first letters and then he guessed the word. So it was often very confusing for me to understand his telling about his book. I couldn’t understand the story, but for my imaginative son it always made sense. Great luck for your son to had such a supportive teacher!

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    1. Our son was similar too for a while. He never enjoyed reading. He found writing very difficult also. He still doesn’t like it much, but at least he is enjoying reading!

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      1. My youngest is a fast thinker, it bores him, takes too long for him. But now he need it for math text problems and he is realizing more and more how important it is to read exactly.

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  3. Awesome! I remember when I suddenly realized that books had changed from collections of words that told a story into a movie that played in my head. And I’ll confess that it wasn’t yet by the end of 3rd-grade. Sharp (and well encouraged) young man.

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